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The Best 4 Financial Reports For HOAs & Condo Communities

The Best 4 Financial Reports For HOAs & Condo Communities

[ Blog/News ]
Ihear it all the time, the board gets a stack of paper reports but doesn’t look at them. The reason why? I suspect information overload and not knowing what to look for in each report. It can be overwhelming for a community board member that isn’t used to looking at financial reports.

So how about if you only needed a handful of reports to look at – it would make it simpler and take less time to get a picture of your association’s financial health. The following are my top four financial reports for HOAs and condo communities.

Board members have a fiduciary responsibility to exercise due care and diligence when overseeing the community and its funds. These 4 reports are vital tools for protection of association assets, control and planning:

Best 4 Financial Reports

[1] Aged Delinquency Report

Aged Delinquency Report Example

This aged delinquency report/aged owner balance report shows who is behind in their assessments. Different reports can also break out the delinquency by type of charge owed (assessment, late fees, etc). The board needs to review this at every board meeting to see what action needs to be taken at certain late dates (30, 60 days) like sending a demand letter or turning the account over to a collection attorney or agency.

If you get behind in collections it can cause a problem with services at your community and worse, you may not be able to collect the entire past due amount depending on your state laws and how long it took you to commence a legal action. Some states only guarantee collection of 9 months past due assessments and it takes a few months for the action to work itself through the courts so if you are owed a year you may only get 9 months – ouch!

[2] Comparative Income & Expense Report

Comparative Income & Expense Report Example

This is my favorite report to run for the association. The Income Statement is meant to inform how the association is doing compared to budget. It shows the current period actual expense, budgeted expense and any variance between the two. It also shows the same thing for the year to date.

When you see a variance it is a warning flag to ask why and dig deeper. It can also allow you to make up any shortfall quickly so you don’t cripple your community’s cash flow and vendor payments. For example if you are spending more on snow removal than budgeted due to an extreme winter you can do a special assessment right away to cover the shortfall while it is still cold and owners are more understanding.

[3] Balance Sheet

Balance Sheet Example

A balance sheet is an important part of the financial package. It tells where the association stands with their asset, liability and reserves at a particular point in time. There are three key accounts on a balance sheet that association officials should pay special attention to:

  • Cash in the Operating Checking Account – shows ability to meet current operating expenses.
  • Accounts Payable – shows how much is owed to vendors and service providers.
  • Capital Reserves – shows how much is available for major capital repair and replacement projects in the near and distant future.

[4] Bank Reconciliation Report

Bank Reconciliation Report Example

The Bank Reconciliation report is used to “prove” that the cash assets shown on the association’s books and balance sheet agree with what the bank statement shows. The reconciliation takes into account outstanding checks that have not been processed by the bank as well as deposits of cash that have not been processed by the bank. There should not be any difference it should be $0 but if there is a difference it is a flag for you to look into something further.

Additional Reports to Consider:

Bank Statements

Bank statements are another tool to ensure you are not a victim of theft. Plus, you can easily see how much money you have in the bank. Bank statements are easier to understand than the balance sheet since we’re all used to looking at them and they show the current amount of money in the bank account(s), recent deposits and withdrawals.

Current Capital Reserve Plan

You don’t need a fancy report, but you should have something that shows how much money you have set aside and the anticipated cost for replacements and larger capital projects. This report is far superior than looking at a capital/ reserve bank account which can be deceiving. You may think you have a lot of money saved but if you had a big roofing or paving project it could be wiped out with no funds for other projects.

As a volunteer board member, you only have so much time to dedicate to operating your community. There are emergencies to deal with, vendors, projects and of course financial and administrative tasks. A large part of your responsibility is your fiduciary responsibility to the community. Overseeing that the community funds are safe and being spent properly is of high importance. End Of Article

This article first appeared in the Jan/Feb Issue of Community Associations Journal.

By Russell Munz, CMCA

By Russell Munz, CMCA

Russell Munz, CMCA is the  founder of Community Financials which provides stress-free financial management to self-managed communities and managers nationwide.  Previously, Russell grew a successful 41-person full-service management company over 16 years; he now provides big company systems and processes to a new audience.

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Chapter Magazine

Community Associations Journal May 2019 Issue - Cover

Calendar

May 2019

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1
  • Communications Comm Mtg
2
  • CA Day Committee Mtg
3
4
5
6
7
8
  • Board Meeting
9
  • Managers Only Meeting
10
11
  • Tri-Cities Educational Symposium
12
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  • CAI Annual Conference (Orlando, FL)
15
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  • Community Outreach Committee Mtg - WSCAI
16
  • CAI Annual Conference (Orlando, FL)
17
  • CAI Annual Conference (Orlando, FL)
18
  • CAI Annual Conference (Orlando, FL)
19
20
21
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  • Business Partners Comm Mtg
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23
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Hitting a Moving Target: How to Stay on Budget this Fiscal Year

Hitting a Moving Target: How to Stay on Budget this Fiscal Year

[ Blog/News ]

Y ear after year, many associations struggle with the same concern: staying on budget. While there are certainly times where unforeseen expenses arise that send your budget into a tail spin no matter how proactive you were, there are a few steps your association can take to help your budget stay in the black by the end of the year.

Target IconBudget Adequately

Your budget is never going to stay on track if it wasn’t adequate in the first place. If your association’s water and sewer bills have averaged $8,000 per year for the past three years, it isn’t reasonable to budget $6,000 for the upcoming year. Therefore, take a moment to review your budget in depth to make sure that it is adequate. Compare the 2019 budgeted amounts to last year’s actual expenses, and if there is a significant variance, find out why. If you didn’t do so during budget season, consider calling your local utility companies to determine what, if any, rate increase will take effect this year. Even a moderate utility increase can affect an association that consumes significant utilities, such as a condominium that includes water and sewer in the assessments. We all understand an association’s drive to keep assessments as reasonable for the membership as possible, however the association also has certain operating expenses to cover and it is important that the budget adequately represents those expenses.

Target IconReview Your Contracts

Take a moment to review your recurring contracts, such as management and landscaping, to determine what is included in the monthly rate to reduce the risk of any surprise expenses. As an example, most landscape contracts exclude tree trimming above a certain height; if your association finds a need to trim trees this year, it may be an extra expense and it would be helpful to know this in advance, so the association can prepare accordingly. It is also helpful to anticipate what administrative expenses may arise that are not included in your management contract, such as special mail-outs to the membership.

Target IconCheck Your Reserve Study

It is important that your association is familiar with the components which are, and are not, included in your reserve study. This will ensure that expenses are paid out of the correct account and that your budget accurately represents your actual anticipated expenses. Many smaller routine maintenance expenses, such as annual roof moss treatment and gutter cleaning, should be handled as an operating expense and not through the reserve account so it is important to ensure that your budget includes line items for these expenses. It is also important that your association contributes to the reserve fund at one of the rates recommended by your reserve study. Under Washington State Law, your reserve study must provide baseline and 100% full funding recommendations; the association should ensure that it is budgeting somewhere within this range to lessen the risk of a future special assessment. My firm recommends that the association budget at the 70% to 100% full funding level, however that is a topic for another article.

Target IconConsider Delinquencies

Most associations determine the assessments amount after they have calculated the exact amount of the anticipated expenses. This approach assumes that all owners will pay their assessments on time, which we know is often not the case. If your association has considerable delinquencies, it should consider how to adjust the operating budget to ensure that adequate operating funds are available. Most associations include a line item for “bad debt expense” that is based on a percentage of assessments from historical trends, or an actual calculation based on current and projected delinquencies. Your management company and/or CPA, who knows your association best, will be a great resource for advice on how best to proceed. As part of this process, the association should also consider the resources which will be needed to collect on delinquencies. While most governing documents permit the cost of collection to be billed back to the owner’s account, the association still needs to have funds available to pay those fees up front.

Target IconTrack Utilities and Conserve

Most associations have some sort of utility bill, even if it is just for irrigation of the common area landscaping, and most utility bills include consumption data. Your association may consider tracking consumption so it can more easily identify unexplained spikes in usage. Some utilities are going to fluctuate based on the time of the year; water usage, for example, often peaks during the summer months when landscape is being irrigated. However, if your water usage spikes in February, it may be an indicator of a leak. Since utilities can be one of an association’s largest operating expenses, consult with your landscape vendor to see if inexpensive conservation methods are available (rain sensors added to irrigation systems or drought tolerant plantings, for example), and encourage residents to conserve. Many utility companies offer free or discounted utility conservation packages to residents which include low-flow shower heads and sink aerators so be sure to check with your local utility company to see what is available in your area.

Target IconDon’t Let Budget Shortfalls Affect Reserves

Many associations make their monthly reserve transfers as the last transaction of the month. In theory this makes sense because the association wants to ensure that funds are available to pay all the other bills first, such as landscaping, utilities and insurance. For an association that is struggling to stay on budget, the transfers to reserves that were not made begin to pile up on the balance sheet as a liability to the reserve account and at the end of the year, that association must decide whether to increase assessments the next year to make up those reserve transfers. It is important that the association create a plan to catch up on reserve transfers, and ideally, create a budget that is adequate so they don’t fall behind again in the future. As a side note about budgeting for reserves, it is recommended that the association include the reserve contributions as either a line item under income or expenses, and not at the end of the budget. Reserve contributions are a true “expense” to the association; they represent the annual deterioration of the association’s assets and are quantifiable through the association’s reserve study. By listing them at the bottom of the budget, it gives the membership the impression that not only are they less important than the other line items in the budget, but that they are a “catch all” for excess income which is not the case at all.

Target IconBudget for Contingencies

One way of helping to ensure that the association will not go over budget or need to borrow from reserves for unexpected operating expenses is to budget for contingencies. Some associations set up a contingency line item and the amount depends on the association’s history of overruns and circumstances. Other associations include a contingency amount in most budgeted line items, such as 5%. This is highly recommended as the association should expect the unexpected!

Target IconCheck Your FDIC Limits

While it isn’t necessarily budget related, it is also a good idea to review your bank balances annually to ensure that they are not exceeding the FDIC limit. FDIC stands for Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation which provides insurance coverage for the balances that are held in a bank account(s) at an FDIC insured institution in the case that the bank were to fail. The current FDIC limit is $250k per depositor (not per account). If your association has more than $250k held at one banking institution, it should consider moving funds in excess of the $250k to another institution to ensure that those funds would be insured/protected in the rare case that the bank were to fail. Budget time is a great time to review these limits, as oftentimes reserve contributions in the upcoming year may cause the association’s balances to exceed the FDIC limit. There are a few unique circumstances which may affect FDIC limits when it comes to certain investments, therefore it is best to consult with your banker and/or CPA prior to moving any funds.

Hopefully you have now reviewed your budget and checked all the boxes that indicate that it is adequate. But what happens if you are concerned that the association may fall short this year? In this instance, many associations have the ability to pass a supplemental budget, which essentially replaces any budget that was previously ratified by the membership. The process for passing a supplemental budget is often the same as it was for the original budget, however do check your governing documents and consult with legal counsel if any questions arise.

Budgeting is both an art and a science. You will never completely hit the mark as the budget is an estimate, however using these principles will help you stay closer to your target. End Of Article

This article first appeared in the Jan/Feb Issue of Community Associations Journal.

By Karen McDonald, CMCA, AMS, PCAM, RS

By Karen McDonald, CMCA, AMS, PCAM, RS

Karen McDonald, CMCA, AMS, PCAM, RS is a Project Manager at Association Reserves of WA. A former association manager, 2019 marks Karen’s 19th year in the community association industry where she now helps bridge the gap between associations and their reserve studies. Karen is the current President for the WSCAI Chapter and serves on the Market Expansion Committee and as liaison to the Membership Committee. Outside of the office, she enjoys gardening and traveling.

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Chapter Magazine

Community Associations Journal May 2019 Issue - Cover

Calendar

May 2019

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1
  • Communications Comm Mtg
2
  • CA Day Committee Mtg
3
4
5
6
7
8
  • Board Meeting
9
  • Managers Only Meeting
10
11
  • Tri-Cities Educational Symposium
12
13
14
  • CAI Annual Conference (Orlando, FL)
15
  • CAI Annual Conference (Orlando, FL)
  • Community Outreach Committee Mtg - WSCAI
16
  • CAI Annual Conference (Orlando, FL)
17
  • CAI Annual Conference (Orlando, FL)
18
  • CAI Annual Conference (Orlando, FL)
19
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  • Business Partners Comm Mtg
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23
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  • Market Expansion Comm Mtg Conf Call
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Commonly Ignored Best Practices of Commercial Landscape Maintenance

Commonly Ignored Best Practices of Commercial Landscape Maintenance

[ Blog/News ]
How you care for your plants makes all the difference in the lifespan and overall look of them. Here are some best practice tips for landscape maintenance:

Pruning

Pruning ClippersThe difference between hard pruning versus using hedge shears is significant when not shearing the correct plants. The more you improperly prune your plants, the more often you will need to be outside pruning them. Keeping the significant pruning to hard pruning in the winter will make a difference in how time consuming your plants are throughout the rest of the year.

Trees

TreeClearing low-hanging branches and overgrown plant material will open up lines of sight into your property, decrease potential hazards and eliminate safety concerns of individuals hiding in your plants.

Mowing

Lawn MowerWith the weight of a commercial mower and mowing in the same direction each week, your turf is prone to having a matted look, unhealthy and unsightly grass. You can help fix that by alternating your mowing pattern each visit encouraging standing turf.

Fertilizer

FertilizerFertilizer can be a great resource for your turf and plants, but too much of it can harm your landscape. Commonly referred to as fertilizer burn, having too much can cause yellow, brown or dead sections. Additionally, the more you apply fertilizer, the more dependent your turf & plants become on that particular fertilizer to look and stay healthy. Leaving your grass clippings is a great way to naturally fertilize your lawn. Organic fertilizers are also a great way to have a more balanced and sustainable landscape.

Seasonal Planting

Flower - AnnualsAnnuals are a great way to add seasonal color to your landscape, whether they are around entrances, signage, walkways or plant beds giving a fresh and updated look to a potentially older property.

Landscape Debris

Wheelbarrow - Yard DebrisCleaning up the landscape debris after you are done maintaining your property, instead of blowing it into the street or a native area will help you to be more responsible as a community association manager or owner and it will make your property and the surrounding areas more appealing and help to reduce pollution problems.

Mulch

GlovesHaving a mulch bed around your trees helps protect the trees’ trunks from mechanical damage caused by mowers and trimmers and improves the overall appearance of the property. Mulching your beds throughout the property can help nourish your plants, increase curb appeal & reduce weed infestation.

Proper Equipment

Gardening ToolsOne mistake seen frequently is people using the wrong equipment for the task at hand. Whether it is hand pruners, string trimmers or mowers, be sure that you or your service provider is giving you the proper and best resources for maintaining your landscape.

Misunderstanding the pitfalls caused by regular landscape maintenance can lead to long-term failure of your landscape. Focusing on the ‘big picture’ of your property and where you want to take the landscape can have a lasting impact on your budget, overall aesthetic and how much effort is required to keep the property looking good long term.

(Editor’s Note: This blog article first appeared in the May 2018 issue of Community Associations Journal.)

By Tim Hawkins

By Tim Hawkins

Owner, Brookstone Landscape & Design

Having been involved in the landscape industry for over 15 years, Tim Hawkins takes pride in developing solutions and opportunities for people! In his free time, he enjoys running marathons and spending time with his family.

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Chapter Magazine

Community Associations Journal May 2019 Issue - Cover

Calendar

May 2019

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1
  • Communications Comm Mtg
2
  • CA Day Committee Mtg
3
4
5
6
7
8
  • Board Meeting
9
  • Managers Only Meeting
10
11
  • Tri-Cities Educational Symposium
12
13
14
  • CAI Annual Conference (Orlando, FL)
15
  • CAI Annual Conference (Orlando, FL)
  • Community Outreach Committee Mtg - WSCAI
16
  • CAI Annual Conference (Orlando, FL)
17
  • CAI Annual Conference (Orlando, FL)
18
  • CAI Annual Conference (Orlando, FL)
19
20
21
22
  • Business Partners Comm Mtg
  • Chapter Mixer
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
  • Market Expansion Comm Mtg Conf Call
30
31
Advertise With Us - Click to find out how! WSCAI

Washington State Legislative Update

Washington State Legislative Update

[ Blog/News ]

The Washington State’s 65th Legislative Session adjourned on March 8th. For only the third time in the last decade, the Legislature did not go into Special Session. This is no small feat, finishing on time has only occurred during the short (non-budget) legislative sessions of 2008, 2014, and now 2018. The next Legislative Session will begin on January 7th, 2019. CAI’s Legislative Action Committee (LAC) has already started planning for next year.

Join Us!

If you would like to join the LAC, please reach out to Krystelle Purkey, contract lobbyist, at krystellepurkey@icloud.com.

Government Icon Retirements

There is a high probability of another long session looming, leading to several lawmakers announcing they will not seek reelection in 2018, with more announcing every day.

“It’s almost like we need to be a full-time Legislature, or figure out a different schedule,” Representative Lytton said to The Seattle Times.

As of the end of March, 13 lawmakers have announced they will not be seeking reelection, leaving a large vacuum of political power in Olympia. Political jockeying to fill those voids of power has already begun.

The surprise retirement announcement of Senator Sharon Nelson (34th – Vashon Island), who is the current Majority Leader in the Senate, will mean that no matter what happens in November the Washington Legislature will have a completely new leadership structure. Several Democratic Senators have started throwing their names into the mix as the potential new leader.

In the Senate Republican Caucus, Michael Baumgartner (6th – Cheney) has announced he will be running for Spokane County Treasurer, instead of seeking another term as Senator. Rep. Jeff Holy, Sen. Baumgartner’s current seat mate, will be vying for this seat.

IIn the House of Representatives, three House Democratic Chairs have also announced their retirement:

  • Rep. Kristine Lytton (40th – Anacortes), Chair of the Finance Committee
  • Rep. Ruth Kagi (32nd – Shoreline), Chair of the Early Learning & Human Services Committee
  • Rep. Judy Clibborn (41st – Mercer Island), Chair of the Transportation Committee

On the Republican side of the aisle, 9 GOP House members have announced their retirement, including the House Minority Leader Dan Kristiansen (39th – Monroe). J.T. Wilcox (2nd– Yelm), who was the Deputy Minority leader, was elected as the new leader before the Legislature adjourned.

This large exodus of lawmakers means that the Legislature will have a lot of new personalities and new leadership in all four legislative chambers come 2019.

Government Icon 2018 Election Cycle

In 2018, every member of the House Representatives and half of the Senate is up for reelection.

Both parties have announced that they will be targeting key races throughout Washington State. The Democrats, wishing to secure their majority in all chambers, have announced their top targets as follows: Sen. Mark Miloscia (30th – Federal Way), Sen. Joe Fain (47th – Kent), Sen. Jan Angel (26th – Gig Harbor), and Rep. Mark Harmsworth (44th – Snohomish). The Republicans have announced they will be targeting Senator Steve Hobbs (44th – Snohmish), Rep. Christine Kilduff (28th – University Place), and Rep. Brian Blake (19th – Aberdeen).

Candidate filing deadline is on May 18. All candidates running will need to have declared by this date and then the campaign season will truly kick off.

Government Icon CAI Specific Legislation

During the 2017-18 Biennium, the Legislative Action Committee (LAC) advocated for the interests of CAI members. Over 20 pieces of legislation were actively worked on or monitored this year, however only 3 passed.

Substitute Senate Bill 6175 – WUCIOA

Brief Summary: Establishes the Washington Uniform Common Interest Ownership Act (WUCIOA) to govern the formation, management, and termination of common interest communities including condominiums, homeowner associations, and real estate cooperatives.

Only two sections of WUCIOA will automatically apply to existing common interest communities (condominiums, homeowner associations, and cooperatives) in Washington. One addresses the process for an existing community to elect to be governed by WUCIOA and the other addresses budget ratification and assessments. The full Act will only apply to common interest communities created after its effective date.

Prime Sponsor: Senator Jamie Pedersen

Bill Status: Governor Inslee signed the bill into law on March 27, 2018.

Effective Date: July 1, 2018

Second Engrossed Substitute House Bill 2057 – Foreclosure Fairness

Brief Summary: The striking amendment introduced by Senator Mullet is the culmination of a two-year process with over twenty stakeholders. The final bill is the agreed upon language that touches on everything from Department of Commerce’s foreclosure fairness fees to how the financial server can “maintain” the property. The two sections that impacted community associations were: deceased borrower and nuisance abatement.

The deceased borrower provisions created a process for servicer and associations to follow if an individual passes away without a will and is in a foreclosure procedure.

The nuisance abatement section forces servicers to conduct maintenance on the property if it falls into all three of the following categories:

  1. It is in a foreclosure
  2. The property is abandoned
  3. The city or county has deemed it a nuisance under prudery. Associations will be continuing the nuisance discussions over the interim

Prime Sponsor: Representative Tina Orwall

Bill Status: Governor Inslee signed the bill into law on March 29, 2018.

Effective Date: June 7, 2018

Substitute House Bill 2514 – Discriminatory Provisions Found in Written Instruments Related to Real Property

Brief Summary: Authorizes an owner of property subject to a written instrument containing provisions void by reason of Washington’s Law Against Discrimination to record with the county auditor a restrictive covenant modification document. Changes the list of unlawful provisions that homeowners association boards may (and in some cases, must) remove from their governing documents by majority vote to include all provisions that are void by reason of Washington’s Law Against Discrimination.

Prime Sponsor: Representative Christine Kilduff

Bill Status: Governor Inslee signed the bill into law on March 15, 2018.

Effective Date: June 7, 2018 – except for section 1, which goes into effect on January 1, 2019.

Government Icon What to Expect in 2019

Throughout the 2018 Legislative Session there was a constant chorus of “Washington needs a more robust housing supply.” However, with the Democrats gaining control again, they had several key pieces of legislation they wanted to pass, pushing the housing discussion off until next year.

This is where the LAC will come into play and we must prepare for what is to come. The following is a list of potential top housing issues for 2019: construction defect claims, dispute resolution programs, and association voter apathy.

As the LAC begins planning for the 2019 Legislative Session, it is always good to start with what was introduced during this last biennium, but did not pass, as it is likely to be reintroduced again.

House Bill 1172: Low-water landscaping

Brief Summary: Prohibits homeowner association and condominium association restrictions that limit private property owners’ ability to deploy low-water landscaping techniques.

Prime Sponsor: Rep. Tina Orwall

Substitute House Bill 1494: Private Road Maintenance

Brief Summary: Requires the holders of an interest in an easement to maintain the easement and permits agreements that allow maintenance obligations to be allocated to fewer than all holders of an interest in an easement. Requires the cost of maintaining an easement to be shared by each holder of an interest in the easement.

Prime Sponsor: Rep. Jeff Morris

House Bill 2022: Homeowners’ Association Violations

Brief Summary: Entitles an aggrieved party, if a willful violation of a homeowners’ association is found, to exemplary damages up to two times the actual damages sustained.

Prime Sponsor: Rep. Christine Kilduff

Substitute House Bill 2475: Tolling of Construction Defect Claims

Brief Summary: Revises the notice and opportunity to cure process in a construction defect action, adding a mediation process and further detail with respect to the termination of this process. Extends tolling provisions and provides for tolling in the context of claims by one construction professional against another.

Prime Sponsor: Rep. Cindy Ryu

Substitute House Bill 2485: Low-Water Landscaping

Brief Summary: Prohibits homeowner association and condominium association restrictions that limit private property owners’ ability to deploy low-water landscaping techniques.

Prime Sponsor: Rep. Tina Orwall

Substitute House Bill 2790: AGO Dispute Resolution Program

Brief Summary: The Office of the Attorney General (AGO) is directed to establish a dispute resolution pilot program in Clark, King, and Spokane counties, for the resolution of disputes between condominium and homeowners’ association boards and owners. The pilot also instructs the AGO to create educational materials on the rights of homeowners and the authority of the boards.

Prime Sponsor: Rep. Vicki Kraft

Substitute House Bill 2831: Association Notice Requirements w/Condo Defect Litigation

Brief Summary: Requires increased notice, a meeting, and a majority vote of the homeowners before the board of a condominium or homeowners’ association may commence a construction defect action.

Prime Sponsor: Rep. Tana Senn

SB 5082: Fire safety compliance

Summary: Requires an insurer, before issuing or renewing a policy of insurance to the owner of commercial or residential rental property for coverage of the premises, to require the owner to certify that he or she is in compliance with fire safety requirements. Requires an insurer, before issuing or renewing a policy of insurance to an association for a condominium, to require the association to certify that the condominium is in compliance with fire safety requirements.

Prime Sponsor: Sen. Kirk Pearson

SB 5134: HOA Notice and Opportunity Provisions Relating to Certain Enforcement Actions Taken by a Homeowners' or Condominium Association

Summary: Before a homeowner’s association or unit owner’s association may impose and collect charges for late payments of assessments, the owner must be give 45 days notice and an opportunity to be heard by the board of directors or their designee. It is also clarified that the opportunity to be heard must be fair and impartial.

Prime Sponsor: Sen. Bob Hasegawa

SB 5250: Condominium Association Bylaw Amendments

Summary of Bill: Revises the condominium act with regard to voting requirements when amending the bylaws of the association.

Prime Sponsor: Sen. Karen Keiser

Senate Bill 5377: HOA Budget Ratification Voting Requirements

Summary of Bill: Removes provision that a budget is ratified unless a majority of the ballots cast in the association vote to reject – and instead, adds requirement that the majority of ballots cast by those in the association present, by person or by proxy, determines the proposed budget vote.

Prime Sponsor: Sen. Tim Sheldon

Senate Bill 5428: Condo Association Litigation Costs

Summary of Bill: Revises the condominium act regarding costs of litigation for condominium associations by changing the definition of constructional defect and prohibits the board of directors from taking action on behalf of the association to: institute, defend, or intervene in litigation or administrative hearings.

The parties to a construction defect dispute must engage in mandatory binding arbitration.

Prime Sponsor: Sen. Mike Padden

Substitute Senate Bill 6001: Amendments to Bylaws

Brief Summary: The bylaws of a condominium may be amended by applying the minimum percentage of affirmative votes to the number of votes received rather than the total number of votes allocated if: 1) the proposed amendment is not seeking to amend the method of amending the bylaws; and 2) three notices are sent by certified mail, at least ten days apart, to the unit owners in advance of the vote either at a proposed meeting or other voting method authorized by the governing documents.

Prime Sponsor: Sen. Karen Keiser

Substitute Senate Bill 6005: Protecting Lienholders' Interests While Retaining Consumer Protections

Brief Summary: County treasurers, at least 180 days before the issuance of a certificate of delinquency, must provide notice to the record owner of residential property that contains information regarding the potential for the homeowner to access mediation under the Foreclosure Fairness Act.  The fee a person may charge a non-natural person to locate abandoned property is 35 percent of the value returned to the owner.

Prime Sponsor: Sen. Mark Mullet

We Need Your Support!

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The LAC thanks all the members who have stayed involved and diligent this year. We will continue to fight for all community associations throughout the State, but we will still need your support.

In 2019, housing will be one of, if not the most, debated issues at the Washington State Legislature. Please keep a look out for CAI’s “Calls-to-Action” and let your lawmakers know how important it is for them to support our industry. We are essential to a thriving and prosperous Washington.

If you are not receiving emails for CAI’s “Calls to Action” and would like to get on the distribution list, please contact Dawn Bauman at Dbauman@caionline.org.

Written By WSCAI's Legislative Action Committee (LAC)

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Chapter Magazine

Community Associations Journal May 2019 Issue - Cover

Calendar

May 2019

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1
  • Communications Comm Mtg
2
  • CA Day Committee Mtg
3
4
5
6
7
8
  • Board Meeting
9
  • Managers Only Meeting
10
11
  • Tri-Cities Educational Symposium
12
13
14
  • CAI Annual Conference (Orlando, FL)
15
  • CAI Annual Conference (Orlando, FL)
  • Community Outreach Committee Mtg - WSCAI
16
  • CAI Annual Conference (Orlando, FL)
17
  • CAI Annual Conference (Orlando, FL)
18
  • CAI Annual Conference (Orlando, FL)
19
20
21
22
  • Business Partners Comm Mtg
  • Chapter Mixer
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
  • Market Expansion Comm Mtg Conf Call
30
31
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Federal Tax Law Changes in 2018 for Community Associations

Federal Tax Law Changes in 2018 for Community Associations

[ Blog/News ]

Qualifying residential homeowners and condominium associations have the unique option in Federal taxation to file one of two tax forms. (This discussion does not include nonresidential, timeshare, cooperatives, commercial or exempt associations).

(Editor’s Note: This blog article first appeared in the April 2018 issue Community Associations Journal. It is a second in a two-part article. Part One appeared in the March issue.)

Federal Tax - Blue Icon Federal Tax - Orange Icon Federal Tax - Blue Icon

Community associations can file form 1120-H, U.S. Income Tax Return for Homeowners Associations or they can file form 1120, U.S. Corporation Income Tax Return. The determination as to which tax return to file is outside the scope of this analysis. However, it should be noted that if the association qualifies to file form 1120-H, this is an annual election and an association can change between the two tax returns each year.

The new Federal tax law makes no changes to form 1120-H. There is a flat tax rate on taxable income of 30%. That remains the same.

However, there is a Federal tax rate change when filing form 1120 effective January 1, 2018. 

From 2005 through 2017 there was a phased tax rate schedule as follows:

Over But not over Tax is Of amount over
$0 $50,000 15% $0
$50,000 $75,000 $7,500 + 25% $50,000
$75,000 $100,000 13,750 + 34% $75,000
$100,000 $335,000 $22,250 + 39% $100,000
$335,000 $10,000,000 $113,900 + 34% $335,000
$10,000,000 $15,000,000 $3,400,000 + 35% $10,000,000
$15,000,000 $18,333,333 $5,150,000 + 38% $15,000,000
$18,333,333 35% $0

It is common to hear that the U.S. corporate tax rate has been 35%. However, as noted above, that is not entirely true – and especially not for most community associations. In our experience, we have found that the majority of associations have taxable income under $50,000; thus, their tax rate has been 15%.

Under the new tax law there is a permanent flat corporate rate of 21%. Thus, many community associations will actually see an increase in their tax rate from 15% to 21% when they file their 2018 1120 tax returns.

Additionally, while we are not discussing the pros and cons of filing 1120 vs. 1120-H, it should be noted that filing 1120 is a much riskier tax option and requires much more diligent accounting and financial reporting. At times, the community association has been swayed into filing form 1120 due to the 15% tax differential. However, now that the tax rate difference is 9%, (21% vs. 30%) some associations may consider the cost versus benefits and conclude that the risk is no longer worthwhile for only a 9% tax savings.

For those associations filing form 1120, there are some additional tax law changes:

  • Expensing of short-lived assets (rather than depreciating them). This is fully in effect through 2022, and then gradually phased out by 2026.
  • Elimination of net operating loss carrybacks and limitations on carryforwards.
  • Elimination of the corporate alternative minimum tax.

Quite frankly, most associations will not be affected by the above items. The large, high taxable income community associations should discuss all the new tax law ramifications with their tax preparer. However, most associations filing form 1120 are limited in their ability to use the above deductions. Nonmembership and investment income is taxable. Tax regulations (IRC Section 277) do not allow for an offset to taxable income from membership losses, including depreciation deductions. Again, this is another reason that filing form 1120 is a more complex matter than form 1120-H.

Summary of Impact on Community Associations

  • Form 1120-H – No Change
  • Form 1120 – If taxable income under $50K, tax rate increase from 15% to 21%
  • Form 1120 – If taxable income over $50K – would need analysis based on specifics

By Gayle Cagianut, CPA

Owner, Cagianut & Company, CPA

Gayle Cagianut is the owner of Cagianut & Company (C&C), and has been a leader in the community associations industry for over 25 years. C&C now works with almost 800 associations in Washington and Idaho performing audits and tax returns. As education is a primary focus of C&C, Gayle provides numerous volunteer hours speaking and writing about accounting, auditing and tax matters specific to condominiums and homeowners association.

Gayle is a member of the Washington State Community Association Institute (WSCAI) and Washington Society of CPAs and American Institute of CPAs. She is a CAI National Faculty Member and was elected to CAI National Business Partners Council. 

A prior CAI National Author of the Year Award winner, Gayle is an original co-author for the “Guide to Homeowners Associations” for Practitioner’s Publishing Company (PPC), a national CPA manual. She is also a current contributing author/editor for a Commerce Clearing House (CCH) national CPA manual.

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  • Charter Construction
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  • Condominium Law Group, PLLC - General Counsel & Collection Services - Partners Ken Harer & Valerie Oman - Phone: (206) 633-1520 Website: www.condolaw.net

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  • Barker Martin - Diamond Sponsor
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  • HUB International - Diamond Sponsor
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  • ServPro of Seattle NW - Diamond Sponsor
  • Community Association Underwriters (CAU) - Diamond Sponsor
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  • Columbia Bank - Diamond Sponsor
  • Superior Cleaning & Restoration - Diamond Sponsors
  • ServPro of Edmonds, Lynnwood, and Bellevue West - Diamond Sponsor

Chapter Magazine

Community Associations Journal May 2019 Issue - Cover

Calendar

May 2019

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1
  • Communications Comm Mtg
2
  • CA Day Committee Mtg
3
4
5
6
7
8
  • Board Meeting
9
  • Managers Only Meeting
10
11
  • Tri-Cities Educational Symposium
12
13
14
  • CAI Annual Conference (Orlando, FL)
15
  • CAI Annual Conference (Orlando, FL)
  • Community Outreach Committee Mtg - WSCAI
16
  • CAI Annual Conference (Orlando, FL)
17
  • CAI Annual Conference (Orlando, FL)
18
  • CAI Annual Conference (Orlando, FL)
19
20
21
22
  • Business Partners Comm Mtg
  • Chapter Mixer
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
  • Market Expansion Comm Mtg Conf Call
30
31
Advertise With Us - Click to find out how! WSCAI