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Replace Your Plumbing At 50 Years? 60 Years? Not So Fast…

Replace Your Plumbing At 50 Years? 60 Years? Not So Fast…

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Replace Your Plumbing At 50 Years? 60 Years? Not So Fast…

You may have been noticing an increase in the frequency of plumbing system replacement, at very high costs. Now that a significant portion of the housing stock we serve within Washington Community Associations has reached or is near the 50-year mark of life, expect that trend to continue. But what do you plan for in terms of timing, and cost? Why isn’t total replacement typically in your reserve study?

Answering the last question first, reserve studies are limited to exterior visual inspection and research, for budget purposes, guided by National Reserve Study Standards that state:

  1. must be common association responsibility;
  2. must have predictable useful life;
  3. must have predictable remaining life;
  4. must be significant in cost.

It is the hidden and unpredictable nature of plumbing that often keeps replacement out of the reserve study, unless there is a higher level of evaluation underlying the projected timing and costs. There are so many other issues that associations know about and can see every day, that cause plumbing to go out of view.

It is also a challenge to plan for, because there are many types of plumbing systems, configurations and site conditions that can lead to full replacement in as few as 15 – 20 years, or as far away as 75 – 100 years[1]. There are different material types, grades and wall thickness of piping, water chemistry, fittings, etc. As reserve study providers who regularly track actual expenses in our region, we have noted replacement costs around $10,000 per unit, to recently over $90,000 per unit factoring: asbestos, tight in-wall install conditions, currently high inflation and extensive unit interior repairs.

So again, what do you do? We suggest that you begin by hiring a reputable engineering consulting firm to thoroughly evaluate your particular system conditions, providing recommendations for both near-term care and the most likely timing and rough order of magnitude cost, specification options as basis for planning. This is our approach as proactive reserve budget consultants.

At the end of the day, it is better to have an idea when this large expense may be coming, than continuing to let it slip from view, to someday turn into an even larger disruptive and costly “surprise”.

[1] Source: Kent Engineering

By Association Reserves Washington, LLC

By Association Reserves Washington, LLC

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Written by Jim Talaga, RS

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Reading Financial Statements Series© – Balance Sheet Part 2: CASH

Reading Financial Statements Series© – Balance Sheet Part 2: CASH

[ Blog/News ]

Reading Financial Statements Series© – Balance Sheet Part 2: CASH

We introduced you to balance sheets in our last blog, which was the first in our Reading Financial Statements Series©. In this and following blogs we will explore some typical association balance sheet accounts in more detail. 

CASH! Everyone likes cash! Associations are no different. Without enough cash, association management and community property can become neglected, often leading to future major repairs requiring loans and special assessments. Understanding what activities have the most impact on cash balances is vital to the future success of an association’s operations. As managers and board leaders, it is so important to review cash activity and balances continuously. Be proactive in a timely manner. Not reactive two years down the road.

Cash includes petty cash, checking, and money market accounts. Remember from the last blog, assets represent what an association owns. We recommend a serious review of cash every month. Cash balances are going to significantly impact an association’s ability to pay for budgeted expenses. Not addressing near term cash challenges can result in current and future budget constraints and economic pressure on the association and its members, including surprise assessment increases. (Please refer to our article on budgeting which discusses assessment increases, at www.hoacpa.com). 

Assessment Collections:

If you have significant owner delinquencies, your cash holdings will be negatively impacted. We recommend that you review the accounts receivable balances in conjunction with a review of cash balances every month. As assessments receivable/delinquencies increase, you will usually see a decrease cash balances. Addressing reductions in cash received compared to budgeted revenues will help you to determine if you also need to work on reducing expenses. Know how much money is received each month.

Contributions Of Assessments To The Reserves Fund:

Associations budget for monthly contributions of assessments to the reserves fund. When associations do not make payments from the operating fund to the reserves fund each month because there is not enough money in operating bank account, the reserves fund will start to be underfunded. The association still has a liability to fund reserves per its ratified budget. Not funding reserves because of operating fund shortages will lead to significant cash pressures as major repairs and replacements are deferred and future special assessments and loans may be required to fund expenditures.

We will continue to address various aspects of cash management and controls surrounding cash in future blogs.

By Newman CPA

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By: Jeremy Newman CPA. Newman Certified Public Accountant PC.

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Reading Financial Statements Series© — Balance Sheet

Reading Financial Statements Series© — Balance Sheet

[ Blog/News ]

Reading Financial Statements Series© — Balance Sheet

This blog, introducing you to balance sheets, is the first in our Reading Financial Statements Series©

What Is A Balance Sheet?

Balance sheets present the financial position of your association as of a certain date, usually the month or year end.

What Are The Classifications Of Accounts On My Association’s Balance Sheet?
  • Assets
  • Liabilities
  • Equity or Funds
Assets

What the association owns or owns the rights to, including:

  • Cash
  • Assessments and other receivables
  • Prepaid expenses
  • Deposits
Liabilities

What the association owes or is obligated to pay, including:

  • Accounts payable (unpaid vendor invoices)
  • Accrued expenses
  • Prepaid assessments
  • Deferred revenues
Equity or Fund Balances

The association’s net worth. Generally, represents the cumulative revenues minus expenses over the life of the association since its inception.

Basis of Accounting

One of my favorite topics is “What basis of accounting is used to present your association’s financial statements?” Some balance sheet accounts will not be presented on financial statements if your association presents its financial statements using the cash basis of accounting.

Being aware of what you are reading, as well as what may be missing from the balance sheet you are reviewing is important to your understanding of the association’s financial position each month.

We will dive deeper into the individual accounts like cash and receivables in future blogs in this Series.  A short example of what to look forward to:

  • Cash – Do you know what your bank accounts are used for? Do you verify balances? Are you pursuing returns over security?
  • Receivables – Are you expecting to collect everything that is owed to the association? Did you bill for all services?
  • Payables – How much does the association owe to vendors?
  • Prepaid assessments – Are you shoring up today’s cash balances with money collected for future expenses?
  • Operating Fund (Equity) – Does the association have excess funds, has it been over-spending?
By Newman CPA

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A Strong Reserve Fund Is The Strongest Hedge Against Inflation

A Strong Reserve Fund Is The Strongest Hedge Against Inflation

[ Blog/News ]

A Strong Reserve Fund Is The Strongest Hedge Against Inflation

What is a Community Association’s strongest hedge against inflation? A strong reserve fund! As of the end of April, 2021, increases in the pricing of lumber[1], asphalt binder[2], and other materials have risen well into the double digits when compared to the previous year. Costs for the “Big 9” projects (painting, roofing, asphalt, siding, windows, decks, plumbing, elevators, HVAC) are simply wild and unpredictable right now.

If your association is less than 50% funded, and any of these major projects are due within the next few years, get moving, now. Armed with a well-conceived scope of work, specifications, bid documents, and some time, you’ll stand a good chance of achieving the best value for project $$$ spent.

Strong reserves can hedge against significant price swings, and the extra costs of emergency work, Special Assessments, deferred maintenance, bank loans. Don’t be tempted to cut corners – I can confidently say after thirty plus years of experience, your best value is to hire a reputable consulting firm to oversee the process, and the work for these major projects.

Reserves are all too often thought of as for some distant “rainy day” event. Reserves are for the ongoing, measurable deterioration in your community, and should be thought of as real as any other bill of the association. Past the cautionary notes, there is good news if you are a part of a well-run, and well-funded community association. With Reserves Percent Funded of 70% or more, you have a 1% or less probability of a Special Assessment[3]. For these communities, the news gets even better. Our studies show that on average, resale prices are  ~12% higher than similar properties in their market area with weak reserves.

Think about that.

If you start with a median Seattle area condo unit value of $500,000 and to strongly fund reserves and building maintenance, have been paying ~$150 a month more in assessments over the last seven years than your weakly funded neighbors, you will have paid somewhere around $12,600 more, to realize a sales price $60,000 higher. That’s a nice return. Communities that understand this, and are proactive, vs. reactive, are: easier to live in, easier to manage, and as it turns out, likely a better investment!


[1] Chicago Mercantile Exchange lumber futures
[2] WSDOT Asphalt Binder Reference Cost
[3] Association Reserves, Inc. database

By Association Reserves Washington, LLC

By Association Reserves Washington, LLC

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Written by Jim Talaga, RS

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Rain, Rain, Go Away!

Rain, Rain, Go Away!

[ Blog/News ]

Rain, Rain, Go Away!

April showers bring May flowers…and sometimes uninsured losses! Building damage caused by heavy rain, clogged gutters and storm drains, accumulated water in a crawl space and any other water that originates OUTSIDE of a building is generally excluded on most policies for several reasons.

Flood is defined on most insurance policies as the unusual and rapid accumulation of surface water from any source, natural or otherwise; and is excluded unless you have specifically purchased flood coverage. Most policies also exclude damage caused by continuous or repeated leakage or seepage of water over a period of time, as well as water under the surface of the ground that enters through foundations, basements, walls or floors. Often, policies will require covered damage to the exterior of a building first in order to trigger coverage for interior water damage.

So, how to you minimize the risk from water outside the building causing damage that may not be covered by the association’s insurance policy? Proactive maintenance and risk management! In this case, an ounce of prevention is most definitely worth a pound of cure! Inspect and maintain roofs, gutters and siding regularly to prevent water intrusion issues before they start. Keep gutters and storm drains clear and free of debris that could cause water damage. If you have water in crawl spaces, contact a professional to suggest solutions to manage the water and minimize the risk of building damage. When it rains, make note of accumulating water, and take steps to clear drains or divert water if necessary.

Your association may wish to look into purchasing flood coverage, but it is not always easily available or affordable. Most flood coverage is written through the National Flood Insurance Program, even if your community is not located in a ‘flood zone’ and is generally quite expensive. If coverage is available in the general marketplace, policies usually include high deductibles and premiums.

Rain is a way of life in the Pacific Northwest. It is the price we pay for our beautiful green landscape. With some planning and proactive management, the risk of damage from water can be minimized, and you can look forward to those lovely May flowers!

By Community Association Underwriters (CAU)

By Community Association Underwriters (CAU)

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Ryan Swanson - Jo Flannery - Flannery @ryanlaw.com

Annual Audit Process Efficiencies

Annual Audit Process Efficiencies

[ Blog/News ]

Annual Audit Process Efficiencies

To help make your association’s annual audit go smoothly, it is important to follow and support annual audit process efficiencies:


Audit Process Efficiencies:

Engagement Letter – Sign Early

Obtain board approval of the CPA’s engagement letter three to six months before year-end and transmit to the CPA.

Scope Changes – Early Communication

Let your auditor know as early as possible if there has been a change in the scope of the audit. Scope changes include management/accounting transitions, new special assessments, new loans, new litigation.

Documentation Flow – Ensure all of your documentation is in place

You should have documents to support every transaction, and every balance sheet account. Ensure documents and reports are provided to the auditor as completely and as early in the process as possible. Gather, save, and share documents related to significant transactions.

Irregular Transactions – Have Supporting Documents Ready

The auditor will need supporting documents for non-regular transactions such as laundry rent/commission agreements, cell tower leases, other rental income leases, insurance claims – reimbursements and expenses, special assessments, loans.

Investments – Obtain A Transaction History Report

If your association has investments in treasuries, mutual funds, stocks, bonds, municipal bonds, the auditor will need to determine market value and cost, together with realized and unrealized gains and losses. Ensure you obtain a transaction history report for the whole year from the investment advisor or brokerage. For income tax purposes, it is vital to present accurate gain or loss amounts. Often, brokerages provide annual tax reports which should be provided to the auditor and tax return preparer.

Changes in Management – Ensure All Documents & Reports Are Transitioned

Obtaining all accounting report, transaction documents, agreements, contracts, governing documents and many other documents from prior management is vital to successfully completing an audit; let alone completing an audit efficiently. We recommend a checklist is used to ensure all association reports and documents are transitioned.

Responses to Auditor Inquiries – Complete In Timely Fashion

Complete and timely responses to auditor inquiries can ensure the audit is completed efficiently and with less email exchange.

What are Typical Causes for Incomplete Audits?

Missing bank or investment statements, incomplete insurance claim documentation, incomplete prior management records, incomplete responses, poor tracking of special assessment activity.

Concluding the Audit

Upon provision of the draft audit report, auditors also provide boards and management with a representation letter. The representation letter is from the board and management to the auditor. Auditors cannot release final audit reports if the representation letter has not been signed and returned to the auditor.

By Newman CPA

By Newman CPA

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By: Jeremy Newman CPA. Newman Certified Public Accountant PC.

The Good News:

We can walk you through every step of the audit process. Our goal is to make the audit experience as easy as possible for you. Audits do not need to be challenging. Communication and complete documentation are vital.

Visit us online: www.hoacpa.com

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Benefits of Synthetic Turf for Condominiums & Apartments

Benefits of Synthetic Turf for Condominiums & Apartments

[ Blog/News ]

Benefits of Synthetic Turf for Condominiums & Apartments

These days, synthetic turf is widely accepted as an alternative for sod lawns in both commercial and residential settings.  Condominiums and apartments especially have been converting sod lawn areas into synthetic turf more in the past few years as they discover and reap the benefits of switching over!

First, synthetic turf looks great.  Long gone are the days of the unicolor first-generation products—modern synthetic turf is designed with different color and engineer designed blade shapes as well as multicolored “thatch” to give the turf a full-bodied look and feel like healthy lawn.

It never needs fertilizer or chemicals, no gasoline needs to be burned cutting it thirty-six times a year, the only water you’ll use is to rinse debris off of it, it does not grow weeds, and it has a very high durability allowing it to look beautiful even under heavy foot traffic.  Unlike sod lawns it can be installed in locations with heavy shade or tree coverage, where growing an English lawn is just not feasible, including rooftop gardens!  Synthetic turf is a cleaner, lower maintenance, more eco-friendly way to keep any property looking great while maintaining the usability of lawn areas for outdoor enjoyment.

Gone are drainage problems—synthetic turf drains at 12 gallons per minute and dries quickly, eliminating drainage issues like puddling and pooling!

Synthetic turf can stand up to heavy use—including pets!  The turf is infilled with a positive ion mineral, zeolite, which absorbs odors to be rinsed away with the next rainstorm.  Because of the excellent drainage, the lawn dries quickly afterward and because it is laid on top of a bed of crushed rock there is no exposed dirt to create mud—it’s all around cleaner and easier!

Very low maintenance cost, great appearance 24/7/365 and better for the environment, these are the reasons that communities are making the switch to synthetic turf.  As experts in synthetic turf install, we are here to help with your questions!

By Transblue

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Transblue is licensed bonded and insured, as well as is a proud member of the Better Business Bureau.

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Financing Remediation Projects

Financing Remediation Projects

[ Blog/News ]

Financing Remediation Projects

Last month, Jeremy Newman of Newman CPA had an excellent article on accounting for special assessments. This blog will discuss other important considerations should an association consider financing its remediation project.

Important Considerations
  • Plan Early: Develop a relationship with a lender early on to best prepare the association for financing. Projects typically “percolate” for months and/or years. This is valuable time to work with a lender to determine the amount available to borrow and a plan for any deficiencies the lender might detect.
  • Conserve Your Reserves: In determining funds available, keep in mind that lenders will require a certain amount of liquidity and the ability for the association to continue to fund their reserves. For major remediation projects, a “post-construction” reserve study is a valuable tool for the association to plan required reserve contributions annually after remediation. This shows the lender that the association is proactively planning its budget to meet the future capital maintenance needs and be able to service its loan payment.
  • Educate, Educate, Educate: Successful special assessment ratifications result from keeping the owners informed throughout the process. Your project team is happy to prepare town hall presentations so there are no surprises when it is time to ratify the supplemental budget. Engage your attorney to be sure all appropriate steps are taken to properly ratify the budget.
Next Steps

Now that the owners have enthusiastically embraced the project, it is time to think about the funds being accumulated for the special assessment. You will want to open a special assessment account that, depending on the size of the assessment, could well be over the FDIC limit of $250,000. Not to worry. Columbia Bank’s DDM account can provide FDIC insurance up to $25 million with complete liquidity and is seamless to the association. Funds over a target balance are swept daily to the DDM account where funds will be distributed amongst various institutions in $250,000 increments.

By Columbia Bank

By Columbia Bank

Chapter Happenings Sponsor, March 2021

Columbia Bank works with management companies, associations and their boards to develop appropriate lending and treasury management solutions.

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jonesj@columbiabank.com

Becky Kost, Deposits
rkost@columbiabank.com

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Ryan Swanson - Jo Flannery - Flannery @ryanlaw.com

Water Damage: When Should You Call A Professional?

Water Damage: When Should You Call A Professional?

[ Blog/News ]

Water Damage: When Should You Call A Professional?

With water damage, there are situations where it is important to call a professional. Here are some examples of situations where professional help should be sought out:

Moisture has gone from one unit to another unit or space:

At times one unit does not think water has gone into another space but the source unit should be addressed by a professional who will assess this and then come up with a strategy as to how to handle it and if it has spread. The professional will make appropriate recommendations based on type of water, how long it has been wet, if materials can be salvaged and more.

When you have identified microbial growth on any building surface:

You might find it on anything from walls to floors to cabinets and frequently the growth is noticed before a leak is detected. A technician can determine if it related to plumbing, siding or roof failures, poor air circulation or other causes to then make recommendations as to how to best handle it.

Drain water backs up out of a toilet, sink or tub:

All drain water should be considered highly contaminated and when it soaks into carpet or drywall it can have adverse health effects along with being a super fuel for other types of microbial growth. Most people assume that sewage is highly contaminated but any drain water is considered highly contaminated and just as dangerous.

When you need help finding a leak:

Many times, people just think of plumbing when leaks occur yet when you are not sure where the water is coming from, a certified technician can help expose if something is coming from the roof, windows, siding or more. Additionally, they can help eliminate sources thus pinpointing the root cause.

To assess the extent of a complex water-related incident:

Complex water related incidents can include many scenarios. Some examples are a mystery leak that is finally resolved and then discovered to have affected many other areas that are along the water lines. It is always best to err on the side of caution with having inspections done regularly and addressing any issue when it is small before it becomes a bigger issue.

By Fischer Restoration & Fischer Plumbing

By Fischer Restoration & Fischer Plumbing

Chapter Happenings Sponsor, March 2021

Co-Authors:
Kelly Stone, Fischer Business Development & David Schmidt, Construction Manager, Master Water Restorer

Fischer Restoration:
6608 220th St. SW. Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043
info@fischerrestore.com
206-633-2065
www.FischerRestore.com

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Remove Mold At The Source

Remove Mold At The Source

[ Blog/News ]

Remove Mold At The Source

Mold is ubiquitous to our environment, and if trapped moisture is involved in an enclosed space, it can create an unpleasant odor issue. The best way to mitigate? Remove it at the source.

A recent COIT client complained of a mysterious smell emanating from a restroom. Using an infrared camera and non-penetrating meters, moisture was discovered in the finished surfaces. Further penetrative investigation revealed that the structural steel inside the wall was encased with Monokote, a highly absorbent fire proofing material.

The source of the odor? The waste line inside the wall, which had been slowly leaking over a period of time. In addition, the Monokote was absorbing the excess free liquid, leaving a humid and odiferous interstitial space. The liquid had also wicked up the building material, allowing mold growth on the gypsum wallboard (GWB) paper inside the wall.

To start, the bathroom was shut down and proper engineering controls were installed by COIT technicians to maintain negative air pressure and limit public access. Fixtures were also removed from walls, protected, wrapped, and put aside; wall tile and GWB were removed in all the affected areas.  

The COIT experts then climbed into the interstitial space and scraped off the Monokote, roughly 2’ on all the structural steel, and used wire brushes to remove the built-up corrosion.  

Expert removing/remediating mold in a hazmat suit and safety mask.

They then used High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) vacuums to clean each surface within the work area several times. Finally, the COIT techs used an EPA-registered disinfectant to damp-wipe the remaining building materials in the wall cavity and finish surfaces of the bathroom.

After remediation was completed, dehumidification was used, and when the Industrial Hygienist (IH) ran his air samples and used the “sniff” test, he confirmed no residual odors remained. By using source removal methods, the space passed IH exit evaluation and air sampling.

If you suspect a potential microbial issue, be sure to seek out not only a reputable Indoor Environmental Professional (IEP), but also expertly trained remediation technicians who use only published and approved industry standards and practices in order to assure the best possible resolution of your issue.

By Superior Cleaning & Restoration

By Superior Cleaning & Restoration

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Special Assessment Accounting. Aware. Diligent. Timely. Accurate. Complete.

Special Assessment Accounting. Aware. Diligent. Timely. Accurate. Complete.

[ Blog/News ]

Special Assessment Accounting. Aware. Diligent. Timely. Accurate. Complete.

Record keeping and accounting for special assessments should not be as challenging as it often is. Often, as auditors we find the accounting for special assessments is incomplete due primarily to changes of management companies, inadequate tracking of owners’ accounts and payments, accounting for special assessment receipts in the wrong fund, and/or special assessment forecasts are inadequate to determine if there will be sufficient funds to pay for all repairs or pay off a loan.

We recommend a permanent file of special assessment documents, including:

  • Special Assessment notices to owners
  • Board minutes including documentation of special assessments:
    • Initial levy and approval by members
    • Monthly status
      • Amounts assessed to owners
      • Review owner special assessment amortization schedules
      • Amounts spent for the special assessment purpose
      • Financial status
        • Special assessment cash held
        • Special assessments receivable (billed but not received)
        • Remaining amounts to assess
        • Amounts spent to date
        • Projected remaining expenditure
        • Projected remaining debt service: principal and interest
        • Projected surplus or deficit
      • Conclusion regarding financial status

The information and data recommended above are critical. However, only accurate and complete record-keeping and accounting will provide a board with the data needed to understand the status of a special assessment project and the projected financial picture.

Accounting and Banking

Associations should account for special assessment activity in a separate fund from operating and reserves. A separate bank account and specific account codes should be used. An amortization schedule should be maintained for all owners who are making monthly special assessment payments. Special assessment billing and expenditures should be processed using the special assessment bank account and accounting fund. Any amounts received or paid by other funds should be reconciled and repaid to the other funds at least monthly.

Board Meeting Review

At every board meeting, boards should review the vital data systematically. We recommend that board members review special assessment reports and supporting documents and ask questions before meetings. Keep your eyes on the goals: Collection of all assessments, control over expenditures including debt service, and determining the projected surplus or deficit. Boards need to formulate a plan should there be a projected shortfall. Another special assessment? Increase the loan? Hold off on expenditures?

Boards need to actively participate in the management and accounting for all special assessments.

By Newman CPA

By Newman CPA

Chapter Happenings Sponsor, February 2021

By: Jeremy Newman CPA. Newman Certified Public Accountant PC.

Newman CPA simplifies the HOA CPA process. Our streamlined process enables us to complete your work accurately, efficiently and on time. We understand your need for reliable communication and on-time reporting. We believe that you deserve hassle-free audit & tax services. Have confidence knowing we are your responsive partner here to make your life easier.

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Ryan Swanson - Jo Flannery - Flannery @ryanlaw.com

Year End Accounting: Loose Ends

Year End Accounting: Loose Ends

[ Blog/News ]

Year End Accounting: Loose Ends

For most associations, their fiscal year ends on December 31. If an association does not obtain an independent audit by a Certified Public Accountant, it is perhaps more imperative that boards of directors pay close attention to the year-end financial reports.

Some areas to consider include:
Cash

Ensure all bank accounts have been reconciled. Obtain a copy of reconciliations and bank statements and compare, paying attention to unusual or large reconciling items.

Assessments Receivable

Review the aged receivables report. Understand the reasons for delinquent accounts and ensure that a collection plan is in place to maximize recovery of delinquencies.

Accrued Expenses

Most associations account for expenses only when invoices are paid. Boards should ensure they account for all expenses incurred during the year, regardless of when vendors are paid. Remember, you set a budget for the year. It is easy to overlook a late invoice for this year that may be recorded as an expense in the next year.

Special Assessments

Sometimes special assessment programs last more than one year. Often, special assessments are levied to repay a commercial loan. If accounting for special assessments billed, collected, outstanding or delinquent is inaccurate, a board of directors may not be able to determine if the remaining funds to be collected are sufficient to repay a related loan.

Ensure there is a report showing special assessment billing to and receipts from homeowners. Compare the aggregate of special assessment bank account balances plus amounts to be billed and collected less any outstanding special assessment expenditures to the loan repayment requirements, both principal and interest. Early determination of a potential deficit will provide boards with the opportunity to develop a contingency plan.

Loans

Ensure the correct loan balance is presented on your financial statements. Compare to the loan statement provided by lenders.

Income

Review assessments and other income accounts to ensure all income appears to have been recorded. You will need to know if the financials are prepared on accrual or cash basis. Under the accrual basis, assessment income should match budget.

Expenses

Compare actuals to budget. Inquire about unexpected variances. Ensure all current year expenses have been recorded.

By Newman CPA

By Newman CPA

Chapter Happenings Sponsor, January 2021

Newman CPA simplifies the HOA CPA process. Our streamlined process enables us to complete your work accurately, efficiently and on time. We understand your need for reliable communication and on-time reporting. We believe that you deserve hassle-free audit & tax services. Have confidence knowing we are your responsive partner here to make your life easier.

By: Jeremy Newman CPA. Newman Certified Public Accountant, PC

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