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WSCAI Board Of Directors Vacancies

WSCAI Board Of Directors Vacancies

[ Blog/News ]

The WSCAI Board of Directors is currently seeking candidates to fill two vacant positions on the Board of Directors. One candidate must be a homeowner volunteer member, and the other candidate may be a manager or homeowner volunteer member.

Strong candidates are those that are interested in giving back to the community association industry by volunteering their time, are reliable and punctual, and will lead by example.

Both positions will be filled by appointment by the Board of Directors. The homeowner volunteer appointee will serve until the 2021 election, at which time there would be an opportunity to run for another term. The manager or homeowner volunteer appointee would serve until the 2020 election, and would also have the opportunity to run for another term at that time.

In conjunction with Chapter staff, the Board of Directors plays an integral part of Chapter administration. The Board typically meets on the second Wednesday of the month at 12:30 pm at the Chapter office in Lynnwood, and meetings last approximately one hour with quarterly board meetings in conjunction with committee chairs lasting approximately 2 hours. Attendance is preferred in person, but may also be made by conference call or video platform. A one-day planning session meeting is held during the first quarter of each year, at which attendance is required.

Time obligations outside of the monthly board meetings is minimal, however each board member serves on at least one Chapter committee and time commitments vary by committee.

 

If you or someone you know is interested in being considered to fill one of these vacant positions on the WSCAI Board of Directors, please contact Michelle Leary at the Chapter office.

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Chapter Magazine

Community Associations Journal - July/August 2019 Issue - Cover

Calendar

September 2019

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1
2
3
4
  • Communications Comm Mtg
  • Market Expansion Comm Conf Call
5
  • CA Day Committee Mtg
6
7
  • Budgeting Seminar, Bellevue
8
9
10
  • Education Comm Mtg - WSCAI
11
  • Board Meeting
12
  • Large Scale Managers Workshop (Houston, TX)
13
  • Large Scale Managers Workshop (Houston, TX)
14
  • Large Scale Managers Workshop (Houston, TX)
15
  • Large Scale Managers Workshop (Houston, TX)
16
17
  • Membership Committee Meeting- Conference Call
  • LAC Meeting
  • Social Committee Mtg
18
  • Community Outreach Committee Mtg - WSCAI
19
  • Managers Only Meeting
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
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The Best 4 Financial Reports For HOAs & Condo Communities

The Best 4 Financial Reports For HOAs & Condo Communities

[ Blog/News ]
Ihear it all the time, the board gets a stack of paper reports but doesn’t look at them. The reason why? I suspect information overload and not knowing what to look for in each report. It can be overwhelming for a community board member that isn’t used to looking at financial reports.

So how about if you only needed a handful of reports to look at – it would make it simpler and take less time to get a picture of your association’s financial health. The following are my top four financial reports for HOAs and condo communities.

Board members have a fiduciary responsibility to exercise due care and diligence when overseeing the community and its funds. These 4 reports are vital tools for protection of association assets, control and planning:

Best 4 Financial Reports

[1] Aged Delinquency Report

Aged Delinquency Report Example

This aged delinquency report/aged owner balance report shows who is behind in their assessments. Different reports can also break out the delinquency by type of charge owed (assessment, late fees, etc). The board needs to review this at every board meeting to see what action needs to be taken at certain late dates (30, 60 days) like sending a demand letter or turning the account over to a collection attorney or agency.

If you get behind in collections it can cause a problem with services at your community and worse, you may not be able to collect the entire past due amount depending on your state laws and how long it took you to commence a legal action. Some states only guarantee collection of 9 months past due assessments and it takes a few months for the action to work itself through the courts so if you are owed a year you may only get 9 months – ouch!

[2] Comparative Income & Expense Report

Comparative Income & Expense Report Example

This is my favorite report to run for the association. The Income Statement is meant to inform how the association is doing compared to budget. It shows the current period actual expense, budgeted expense and any variance between the two. It also shows the same thing for the year to date.

When you see a variance it is a warning flag to ask why and dig deeper. It can also allow you to make up any shortfall quickly so you don’t cripple your community’s cash flow and vendor payments. For example if you are spending more on snow removal than budgeted due to an extreme winter you can do a special assessment right away to cover the shortfall while it is still cold and owners are more understanding.

[3] Balance Sheet

Balance Sheet Example

A balance sheet is an important part of the financial package. It tells where the association stands with their asset, liability and reserves at a particular point in time. There are three key accounts on a balance sheet that association officials should pay special attention to:

  • Cash in the Operating Checking Account – shows ability to meet current operating expenses.
  • Accounts Payable – shows how much is owed to vendors and service providers.
  • Capital Reserves – shows how much is available for major capital repair and replacement projects in the near and distant future.

[4] Bank Reconciliation Report

Bank Reconciliation Report Example

The Bank Reconciliation report is used to “prove” that the cash assets shown on the association’s books and balance sheet agree with what the bank statement shows. The reconciliation takes into account outstanding checks that have not been processed by the bank as well as deposits of cash that have not been processed by the bank. There should not be any difference it should be $0 but if there is a difference it is a flag for you to look into something further.

Additional Reports to Consider:

Bank Statements

Bank statements are another tool to ensure you are not a victim of theft. Plus, you can easily see how much money you have in the bank. Bank statements are easier to understand than the balance sheet since we’re all used to looking at them and they show the current amount of money in the bank account(s), recent deposits and withdrawals.

Current Capital Reserve Plan

You don’t need a fancy report, but you should have something that shows how much money you have set aside and the anticipated cost for replacements and larger capital projects. This report is far superior than looking at a capital/ reserve bank account which can be deceiving. You may think you have a lot of money saved but if you had a big roofing or paving project it could be wiped out with no funds for other projects.

As a volunteer board member, you only have so much time to dedicate to operating your community. There are emergencies to deal with, vendors, projects and of course financial and administrative tasks. A large part of your responsibility is your fiduciary responsibility to the community. Overseeing that the community funds are safe and being spent properly is of high importance. End Of Article

This article first appeared in the Jan/Feb Issue of Community Associations Journal.

By Russell Munz, CMCA

By Russell Munz, CMCA

Russell Munz, CMCA is the  founder of Community Financials which provides stress-free financial management to self-managed communities and managers nationwide.  Previously, Russell grew a successful 41-person full-service management company over 16 years; he now provides big company systems and processes to a new audience.

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Chapter Magazine

Community Associations Journal - July/August 2019 Issue - Cover

Calendar

September 2019

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1
2
3
4
  • Communications Comm Mtg
  • Market Expansion Comm Conf Call
5
  • CA Day Committee Mtg
6
7
  • Budgeting Seminar, Bellevue
8
9
10
  • Education Comm Mtg - WSCAI
11
  • Board Meeting
12
  • Large Scale Managers Workshop (Houston, TX)
13
  • Large Scale Managers Workshop (Houston, TX)
14
  • Large Scale Managers Workshop (Houston, TX)
15
  • Large Scale Managers Workshop (Houston, TX)
16
17
  • Membership Committee Meeting- Conference Call
  • LAC Meeting
  • Social Committee Mtg
18
  • Community Outreach Committee Mtg - WSCAI
19
  • Managers Only Meeting
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
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Hitting a Moving Target: How to Stay on Budget this Fiscal Year

Hitting a Moving Target: How to Stay on Budget this Fiscal Year

[ Blog/News ]

Y ear after year, many associations struggle with the same concern: staying on budget. While there are certainly times where unforeseen expenses arise that send your budget into a tail spin no matter how proactive you were, there are a few steps your association can take to help your budget stay in the black by the end of the year.

Target IconBudget Adequately

Your budget is never going to stay on track if it wasn’t adequate in the first place. If your association’s water and sewer bills have averaged $8,000 per year for the past three years, it isn’t reasonable to budget $6,000 for the upcoming year. Therefore, take a moment to review your budget in depth to make sure that it is adequate. Compare the 2019 budgeted amounts to last year’s actual expenses, and if there is a significant variance, find out why. If you didn’t do so during budget season, consider calling your local utility companies to determine what, if any, rate increase will take effect this year. Even a moderate utility increase can affect an association that consumes significant utilities, such as a condominium that includes water and sewer in the assessments. We all understand an association’s drive to keep assessments as reasonable for the membership as possible, however the association also has certain operating expenses to cover and it is important that the budget adequately represents those expenses.

Target IconReview Your Contracts

Take a moment to review your recurring contracts, such as management and landscaping, to determine what is included in the monthly rate to reduce the risk of any surprise expenses. As an example, most landscape contracts exclude tree trimming above a certain height; if your association finds a need to trim trees this year, it may be an extra expense and it would be helpful to know this in advance, so the association can prepare accordingly. It is also helpful to anticipate what administrative expenses may arise that are not included in your management contract, such as special mail-outs to the membership.

Target IconCheck Your Reserve Study

It is important that your association is familiar with the components which are, and are not, included in your reserve study. This will ensure that expenses are paid out of the correct account and that your budget accurately represents your actual anticipated expenses. Many smaller routine maintenance expenses, such as annual roof moss treatment and gutter cleaning, should be handled as an operating expense and not through the reserve account so it is important to ensure that your budget includes line items for these expenses. It is also important that your association contributes to the reserve fund at one of the rates recommended by your reserve study. Under Washington State Law, your reserve study must provide baseline and 100% full funding recommendations; the association should ensure that it is budgeting somewhere within this range to lessen the risk of a future special assessment. My firm recommends that the association budget at the 70% to 100% full funding level, however that is a topic for another article.

Target IconConsider Delinquencies

Most associations determine the assessments amount after they have calculated the exact amount of the anticipated expenses. This approach assumes that all owners will pay their assessments on time, which we know is often not the case. If your association has considerable delinquencies, it should consider how to adjust the operating budget to ensure that adequate operating funds are available. Most associations include a line item for “bad debt expense” that is based on a percentage of assessments from historical trends, or an actual calculation based on current and projected delinquencies. Your management company and/or CPA, who knows your association best, will be a great resource for advice on how best to proceed. As part of this process, the association should also consider the resources which will be needed to collect on delinquencies. While most governing documents permit the cost of collection to be billed back to the owner’s account, the association still needs to have funds available to pay those fees up front.

Target IconTrack Utilities and Conserve

Most associations have some sort of utility bill, even if it is just for irrigation of the common area landscaping, and most utility bills include consumption data. Your association may consider tracking consumption so it can more easily identify unexplained spikes in usage. Some utilities are going to fluctuate based on the time of the year; water usage, for example, often peaks during the summer months when landscape is being irrigated. However, if your water usage spikes in February, it may be an indicator of a leak. Since utilities can be one of an association’s largest operating expenses, consult with your landscape vendor to see if inexpensive conservation methods are available (rain sensors added to irrigation systems or drought tolerant plantings, for example), and encourage residents to conserve. Many utility companies offer free or discounted utility conservation packages to residents which include low-flow shower heads and sink aerators so be sure to check with your local utility company to see what is available in your area.

Target IconDon’t Let Budget Shortfalls Affect Reserves

Many associations make their monthly reserve transfers as the last transaction of the month. In theory this makes sense because the association wants to ensure that funds are available to pay all the other bills first, such as landscaping, utilities and insurance. For an association that is struggling to stay on budget, the transfers to reserves that were not made begin to pile up on the balance sheet as a liability to the reserve account and at the end of the year, that association must decide whether to increase assessments the next year to make up those reserve transfers. It is important that the association create a plan to catch up on reserve transfers, and ideally, create a budget that is adequate so they don’t fall behind again in the future. As a side note about budgeting for reserves, it is recommended that the association include the reserve contributions as either a line item under income or expenses, and not at the end of the budget. Reserve contributions are a true “expense” to the association; they represent the annual deterioration of the association’s assets and are quantifiable through the association’s reserve study. By listing them at the bottom of the budget, it gives the membership the impression that not only are they less important than the other line items in the budget, but that they are a “catch all” for excess income which is not the case at all.

Target IconBudget for Contingencies

One way of helping to ensure that the association will not go over budget or need to borrow from reserves for unexpected operating expenses is to budget for contingencies. Some associations set up a contingency line item and the amount depends on the association’s history of overruns and circumstances. Other associations include a contingency amount in most budgeted line items, such as 5%. This is highly recommended as the association should expect the unexpected!

Target IconCheck Your FDIC Limits

While it isn’t necessarily budget related, it is also a good idea to review your bank balances annually to ensure that they are not exceeding the FDIC limit. FDIC stands for Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation which provides insurance coverage for the balances that are held in a bank account(s) at an FDIC insured institution in the case that the bank were to fail. The current FDIC limit is $250k per depositor (not per account). If your association has more than $250k held at one banking institution, it should consider moving funds in excess of the $250k to another institution to ensure that those funds would be insured/protected in the rare case that the bank were to fail. Budget time is a great time to review these limits, as oftentimes reserve contributions in the upcoming year may cause the association’s balances to exceed the FDIC limit. There are a few unique circumstances which may affect FDIC limits when it comes to certain investments, therefore it is best to consult with your banker and/or CPA prior to moving any funds.

Hopefully you have now reviewed your budget and checked all the boxes that indicate that it is adequate. But what happens if you are concerned that the association may fall short this year? In this instance, many associations have the ability to pass a supplemental budget, which essentially replaces any budget that was previously ratified by the membership. The process for passing a supplemental budget is often the same as it was for the original budget, however do check your governing documents and consult with legal counsel if any questions arise.

Budgeting is both an art and a science. You will never completely hit the mark as the budget is an estimate, however using these principles will help you stay closer to your target. End Of Article

This article first appeared in the Jan/Feb Issue of Community Associations Journal.

By Karen McDonald, CMCA, AMS, PCAM, RS

By Karen McDonald, CMCA, AMS, PCAM, RS

Karen McDonald, CMCA, AMS, PCAM, RS is a Project Manager at Association Reserves of WA. A former association manager, 2019 marks Karen’s 19th year in the community association industry where she now helps bridge the gap between associations and their reserve studies. Karen is the current President for the WSCAI Chapter and serves on the Market Expansion Committee and as liaison to the Membership Committee. Outside of the office, she enjoys gardening and traveling.

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Chapter Magazine

Community Associations Journal - July/August 2019 Issue - Cover

Calendar

September 2019

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1
2
3
4
  • Communications Comm Mtg
  • Market Expansion Comm Conf Call
5
  • CA Day Committee Mtg
6
7
  • Budgeting Seminar, Bellevue
8
9
10
  • Education Comm Mtg - WSCAI
11
  • Board Meeting
12
  • Large Scale Managers Workshop (Houston, TX)
13
  • Large Scale Managers Workshop (Houston, TX)
14
  • Large Scale Managers Workshop (Houston, TX)
15
  • Large Scale Managers Workshop (Houston, TX)
16
17
  • Membership Committee Meeting- Conference Call
  • LAC Meeting
  • Social Committee Mtg
18
  • Community Outreach Committee Mtg - WSCAI
19
  • Managers Only Meeting
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Advertise With Us - Click to find out how! WSCAI

Recruiter leaderboard – test

1st Quarter Recruiter Campaign Leaderboard

By The Numbers:

Current Number of Recruiters

Current Number of New Members Recruited

December 2018 Recruiters

  • Thelma Darling
    6 Recruits
  • Toni Hahn, CMCA
    10 Recruit
  • Jeannie Howell, CMCA, AMS
    8 Recruit
  • Brandye Hubbs, CMCA
    1 Recruit
  • Sergey Petrov, CMCA, AMS, PCAM
    1 Recruit
  • Kenneth Strauss
    1 Recruit

Current Standings

  • Thelma Darling
  • Toni Hahn, CMCA
  • Jeannie Howell, CMCA, AMS
  • Brandye Hubbs, CMCA
  • Sergey Petrov, CMCA, AMS, PCAM
  • Kenneth Strauss
  • Morrison Hershfield - Building Envelope Consulting Services - Ad
  • Barker Martin
  • Charter Construction
  • Condominium Law Group, PLLC - General Counsel & Collection Services - Partners Ken Harer & Valerie Oman - Phone: (206) 633-1520 Website: www.condolaw.net
  • Rafel Law Group
  • McBride Construction
  • Columbia Bank Ad
  • Newman & Associates CPA, PC - Banner Ad
  • Pody & McDonald, PLLC
  • The Copeland Group, LLC

Follow Us

Search Business Directory

Diamond Sponsors

  • Barker Martin - Diamond Sponsor
  • Charter Construction - Diamond Sponsor
  • Rafel Law Group Logo
  • Superior Cleaning & Restoration - Diamond Sponsors
  • RW Anderson Services - Logo
  • Community Association Underwriters (CAU) - Diamond Sponsor
  • JJ2 Building Consultants Logo
  • ServPro of Edmonds, Lynnwood, and Bellevue West - Diamond Sponsor
  • Association Reserves Logo
  • HUB International - Diamond Sponsor
  • Columbia Bank - Diamond Sponsor
  • ServPro of Seattle NW - Diamond Sponsor

Chapter Magazine

Community Associations Journal - July/August 2019 Issue - Cover

Calendar

September 2019

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1
2
3
4
  • Communications Comm Mtg
  • Market Expansion Comm Conf Call
5
  • CA Day Committee Mtg
6
7
  • Budgeting Seminar, Bellevue
8
9
10
  • Education Comm Mtg - WSCAI
11
  • Board Meeting
12
  • Large Scale Managers Workshop (Houston, TX)
13
  • Large Scale Managers Workshop (Houston, TX)
14
  • Large Scale Managers Workshop (Houston, TX)
15
  • Large Scale Managers Workshop (Houston, TX)
16
17
  • Membership Committee Meeting- Conference Call
  • LAC Meeting
  • Social Committee Mtg
18
  • Community Outreach Committee Mtg - WSCAI
19
  • Managers Only Meeting
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Advertise With Us - Click to find out how! WSCAI